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FAB Blog

Paddle the Amazing Places in the Frontenac Arch Biosphere Reserve

There is nothing quite like a calm morning on the water. Hearing the gentle splash as your paddle dips into the quiet waters, seeing your destination approach but not in any rush to get there because you know the journey is why you came. Whether by canoe or kayak, there is something magical about gliding through the water surrounded by the beauty of nature.

Soaring Back

Sometimes you hear and see things that indicate something may be in the area before you know it. Birds like loons may start calling in panicked warning to their fellow feathered friends. You may hear a dozen ducks taking off from their watery calm, a beaver tail’s splash. Songbirds seen and heard feeding and frolicking overhead suddenly may disappear to the sheltered shadows of forest cover. And then it may go silent.

Winter is Coming

I know, I know, you don’t want to talk about it - but it’s inevitable…winter is on the way and preparation can be the key to successfully getting through it. This is true for us humans (sealing windows, gathering firewood, etc.), but of course it is also true and is an extremely important time for much of the wildlife that calls the Frontenac Arch home.

Oh the Weather Outside is Frightful…

Unlike the popular winter song, wildlife species can’t sit by a nice fireplace when the winter weather arrives in earnest.  On the Frontenac Arch, winter is on the way and for many species that means it’s time to find the way out.  Many species obviously migrate to a variety of wintering habitats to the south and for some it is quite a journey.  Osprey for example can migrate as far as South America, travelling over 160,000 km in a lifetime.  Monarch butterflies have a very unique migration story, as generations that live in Ontario and have never seen their winter grounds in Mexico are abl

Going Batty

Not everyone likes to talk about them, they are labored with misinformation and they are dying. Bats are one of the most unique but often misrepresented wildlife species that we have in the area and unfortunately, we are losing some of them at an alarming rate. Bats are the only true flying mammals. There are several species found in Ontario and while some migrate south when winter arrives, a few stay behind and hibernate in caves. It is these hibernating bats that are dying en masse due to a fungal disease known as white nose syndrome.

The Sound of the Whip-poor-will

Can you remember the days when you could head outside in the evening on a cloudless night and hear the distinctive call, “whip-poor-will, whip-poor-will” from nearby forests?  Sadly, the call of the whip-poor-will is being heard less and less and it is now listed as threatened in Ontario.  The whip-poor-will is a mainly nocturnal bird that feeds at night on flying insects.  Its preferred habitats include semi-open forest with exposed rock outcrops, grasslands, pastures, and habitats with exposed mineral soils.  Though it’s not known for sure, it is believed that the whip-poor-will